Community Conversations

Dr. Deepta Ghate, MD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences at UNMC. She is also a recipient of the 2017 Great Plains IDeA CTR Scholar Award. Get more information on her study HERE


Community Conversations June Post

One of the roles of the Community Advisory Board and the community engagement core is to help researchers prioritize research questions and plan for the movement of research into practice. Within the walls of academia and the pages of journal articles the movement of research into practice is defined as an important step on the levels of translational research.

Translational research starts from pre-clinical or human studies that test potential treatment or prevention strategies and includes testing those strategies in clinical settings under ideal conditions, then testing those strategies in typical clinics or community organizations, and finally making policy, system, and environmental changes to support those strategies benefiting whole populations of people.

Research in the areas of pre-clinical and clinical translation, known as T1 and T2, is pretty well developed and defined, though there is still a lot of discussion about where basic science ends and translational science begins. At the other end of the spectrum, testing new treatments and preventive medicine approaches in typical clinics and communities as well as moving science into policy, system, and environmental changes—known as T3 and T4 research—is less well defined and funded. It is arguably also the type of research that can have the greatest impact on communities.

On August 14th and 15th, the Great Plains IDeA Clinical and Translational Research Network will host a workshop to help scientists develop and refine ideas for grant proposals that focus on T3 and T4 dissemination and implementation research. We have a keynote by Dr. Russ Glasgow, an international expert in implementation science and lots of local speakers with expertise and experience getting funding for this type of research. T3 and T4 research projects are intended to move science forward while also having a community impact, so if this is the type of applied work you would like to do or your community would like to engage in, come and join in for our workshop.

Please register before August 7th. For registration, click here


may_2017

Our Community Advisory Board (CAB) is a diverse group of individuals from different backgrounds and professions who are committed to assisting the Great Plains IDeA CTR Network in improving health outcomes in the region. Because CAB members understand a broad range of community health needs, they are expected to provide recommendations about research projects that are most needed to address community health issues, particularly in rural and urban underserved areas. The major CAB activities include: identifying gaps in educational and training materials that promote community health research studies, reviewing Pilot and Scholar grant applications to assess community impact, identifying ideas for potential community-engaged research projects, and encourage the expansion of practice-based research networks (PBRNs) in the region. However, the most important function of the CAB is to identify and prioritize regional health issues based on their combined expertise and knowledge of their communities. South Dakota, North Dakota, and Nebraska are all represented in our CAB and we have 15 members in total. To learn more about our CAB members, visit the Community Advisory Board page on our website.

The CAB meets twice a year and the first meeting was held on March 14th, 2017. Members were given introductory presentations by our Administration, Pilot, and Professional Development Cores. The Co-director of our Clinical Research Design, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics Core, Shinobu Watanabe-Galloway, Ph.D., also gave an in-depth presentation of the major community health issues in our region. A state-by-state analysis shows that each of the Great Plains states in the network have certain strengths and challenges which can lead to prominent health issues to their respective populations. Among the most concerning issues overall are obesity, excessive drinking, and issues related to access to care. During the meeting, CAB members discussed and identified a preliminary list of health priorities. When the CAB reconvenes in the Fall, the list of health priority issues will be finalized and used to help shape the focus of the research grants as we move forward.


2017_04_April

We are excited to introduce Community Conversations – a new monthly blog promoting Clinical and Translational Research (CTR). As Director of the Great Plains IDeA-CTR Community Engagement and Outreach (CEO) Core, it is my pleasure to present the first post as it gives us the opportunity to introduce ourselves and give insight into who we are and what we do. The CEO Core provides a link between CTR investigators and community partners in the region we serve. By acting as a portal between researchers and community, we hope to provide tools and information that helps to achieve our long term goal - a healthier population. In coordination with our Community Advisory Board (CAB) and participating institutions, we disseminate research findings and obtain input from the community, assisting researchers to design studies that respond to priorities identified by community members. 

This monthly blog will cover topics that may be of interest to both researchers and the public. Community Conversations is an outlet for news and updates concerning the Great Plains IDeA CTR Network. Features will include upcoming community events and training opportunities, updates from CAB meetings and CTR seminars, stories from our collaborators and investigators, ongoing clinical trials, study results, grant opportunities, information about telehealth tools, and more. Anyone interested in submitting news or stories relating to CTR or community-based research opportunities should feel free to contact us. We hope that you find this blog informative and engaging as we highlight research findings and bring the community’s voice to everyone in the Great Plains IDeA CTR Network.